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Peacebuilding, Climate Change, and Migration

A Virtual Workshop, March 22 and 24, 2022

Anthropogenic climate change currently threatens to exacerbate displacement and conflict around the world. Through this workshop, we seek alternative outcomes and approaches to these challenges. 

We aim to advance scholarship and policy in two ways. First, we will develop a socio-environmental conception of positive peace that centers indigenous perspectives and environmental justice. And second, we will expand understanding of peacebuilding and migration in understudied regions that are highly vulnerable to climate change, including Southeast Asia, South and Central Asia, and Latin America.

Children walking on dirt road

Day 1: Conceptualizing Environmental Peacebuilding

March 22, 11:25 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. (ET)

What do we know about the relationship between peacebuilding, migration, and climate change? How can we develop a socio-environmental conception of positive peace, which entails developing means of peacefully resolving conflict, and which centers Indigenous perspectives and environmental justice?

Introduction

Rebecca Slayton

Rebecca Slayton

Slayton is director of the Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and an associate professor of science and technology studies.  

Rachel Beatty Riedl

Rachel Beatty Riedl alt headshot

Beatty Riedl is director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies and John S. Knight Professor of International Studies in government.

Presenters

Marieme Lo

Marieme Lo

Lo is associate professor of women and gender studies at the University of Toronto and directs its African Studies Program.

Päivi Lujala

Päivi Lujala

Lujala is an Academy of Finland Research Fellow and professor of geography at the University of Oulu, Finland.

Noor Ahmad Akhundzadah

Noor Ahmad Akhundzadah

Akhundzadah is a visiting professor in Cornell's Department of Natural Resources and the Environment and the South Asia Program.


Day 2: Expanding the Lens

March 24, 11:25 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. (ET)

The regions that are at greatest risk of climate change impacts—including Latin America, Southeast Asia, and South Asia—have been the subject of a minority of studies. What resources, methods, and approaches can help us better understand the relationship between peacebuilding, climate change, and migration in these understudied regions? How can we achieve environmental justice in these areas?

Introduction

Karim-Aly Kassam

Karim Aly Kassam

Kassam is the International Professor of Environmental and Indigenous Studies in Cornell's Department of Natural Resources and the Environment and the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program.

George Wilkes

George Wilkes

Wilkes is director of the Religion and Ethics in the Making of War and Peace Project and a research fellow at University of Edinburgh's School of Divinity.

Presenters

Alpa Shah

Alpa Shah

Shah is a professor of anthropology and convener of ‘Global Economies of Care’ research theme at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE.

Jonathan Padwe

Jonathan Padwe

Padwe is associate professor and undergraduate chair of anthropology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa.

Fábio Zuker

Fábio Zuker

Zuker is a journalist, anthropologist, and Amazon Rainforest Journalism Fund grantee.

This workshop is organized by Cornell University’s Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies, part of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, and funded by the Migrations initiative. Our co-sponsors are the Institute for African Development, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, South Asia Program, Southeast Asia Program, and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.