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Global Racial Justice Fellows

The global racial justice fellows collaborate with the Einaudi Center’s interdisciplinary community committed to research on intersectional inequalities, conducts research on racism, and plans and hosts related events and activities.

Read more about Einaudi’s inequalities, identities, and justice research priority.


Graduate Fellows

Jin Kyung Cho

Jin Kyung Cho

Jin Kyung Cho is pursuing a master of science in advanced architectural design. She is a research-based curator and architect. Her research is focused on the development of environmental and ecological art and architecture since the emergence of earth art in the 1960s. Cho has worked on and organized numerous public projects involving art, architecture, and urbanism. Cho is the inaugural Tony Smith Foundation 2022 Research Residency Fellow and grantee of the Culture and Arts Fund from Arts Council Korea. 

Ariel Dela Cruz

Ariel Dela Cruz

Ariel Dela Cruz (they/he) is a PhD student in the Department of Performing and Media Arts. At the intersections of performance studies, queer studies, trans studies, and Filipinx studies, their research conceptualizes care as a mode of world-making and as a liberatory praxis enacted by transmasculine Filipinx people. As a queer and transmasculine Filipinx-Canadian, they have worked as a community worker and educator in Toronto for over six years. As a graduate fellow, they hope to draw attention to queer and trans reimaginings of futurity, relationality, and solidarity beside and despite racial injustices.

Karina Edouard

Karina Edouard

Karina Edouard is a PhD student in the Department of Anthropology. Her research examines the effects of race and immigration status on health outcomes, particularly within Haitian diasporic communities in the U.S. She explores this relationship through questions concerning intergenerational trauma, biopolitics, embodiment, health policy, and kinship. She is a photographer and plans to incorporate visual methods into her project. As a graduate fellow, she would like to investigate the interconnectedness of social justice movements across geographical and temporal milieus.

Re’ee Hagay

Re’ee Hagay

Re’ee Hagay is a PhD candidate in the Department of Near Eastern Studies. His research develops a theoretical framework of sonofragmentation across historical contexts and media in the Middle East. Focusing on the border aesthetic of Mizrahi Jews in Israel/Palestine, he suggests that sonofragmentation allows us to trace the deracializing potentiality in the fragmentary quality of disparate yet surprisingly related archival materials. As a graduate fellow, he would like to rethink secularism as an epistemic limit of critical knowledge in Western academia.   

Kendra Kintzi

Kendra Kintzi

Kendra Kintzi is a doctoral candidate in development sociology. Her research examines the material politics of renewable energy in the Levant, centering intersectional feminist approaches to ask how urban communities in Jordan experience and shape processes of environmental change. Questions of resource governance, urbanization, and the political economy of development drive her research. As a graduate fellow, she plans to explore connections between ongoing struggles for decolonial liberation and glimpses of what racial justice could look like in the postcolonial world.

Alivia Moore

Alivia Moore

Alivia Moore is pursuing a PhD in the Department of Communication. Her research interests span the field of interpersonal communication, with a specific focus on the effects of social group membership on perceived trustworthiness. Her research has also touched on climate change issues by exploring how interpersonal discussion can impact mitigation support. As a graduate fellow, she would like to explore how social identity may affect truth bias within individuals and address ways to raise trust and lower conflict between groups.

Chinasa T. Okolo

Chinasa T. Okolo

Chinasa T. Okolo is a PhD candidate in the Department of Computer Science. Her research examines how community healthcare workers in rural India perceive and value artificial intelligence (AI). She designs interactive prototypes and employs ethnography to understand what aspects of model decision-making need to be explained with the goal of improving how AI methods target novice technology users. As a graduate fellow, she plans to identify intersectional inequities that occur in the development and use of algorithmic systems, especially in low-resource areas of the Global South.

I-An "Amy" Su

I-An Su

I-An "Amy" Su is a PhD student in the Department of Psychology. Her research focuses on how cultural, socioeconomic, and socio-emotional factors influence children's testimonial competencies in legal contexts. She also works on the psychological science of false memory and the legal decision-making of death row inmates' competency for execution evaluations. She worked as an attorney-at-law in Taiwan, specializing in capital case litigation for people with special needs. As a graduate fellow, she plans to consider how science can help to remove barriers for the vulnerable.


Postdoctoral Fellows

Mohamed Abdou

Mohamed Abdou

Mohamed Abdou graduated from Queen’s University with a doctorate in cultural studies and holds a BAH/MA in sociology. He is an assistant professor of sociology at the American University of Cairo and an interdisciplinary scholar of Indigenous, Black, critical race, and Islamic studies, as well as gender, sexuality, and decolonization. He is author of the forthcoming book Islam and Anarchism: Relationships and Resonances (Pluto Press, 2022). He wrote his transnational dissertation on Islam & Queer-Muslims: Identity & Sexuality in the Contemporary.

Tanzeen Doha

Tanzeen Rashed Doha

Tanzeen Rashed Doha is an anthropologist of Islam and secularism. He holds a PhD in anthropology from the University of California, Davis. His research explores the relationship between race and religion as categories of modern secularity, specifically looking at questions concerning blackness and Islam. His ethnographic work examines problems of betrayal, hypocrisy, false worship, disbelief, and other political and moral actions and psycho-existential conditions, through an engagement with 20th-century Islamist thought.